Kibitzing kitchen table: What’s the weather like?

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LOUD trended on Twitter early Wednesday morning as Los Angeles residents were woken up by intense thunder in a storm so strong it shook their homes.

One person tweeting about thunder wrote that LA isn’t supposed to have this kind of weather.

Oh good?

I have never known a storm that shook my house. Sounds like a scary experience and the pre-dawn storm made me curious about the impact of a changing climate on the severity of thunderstorms.

A thunderstorm is powered by warm, moist air and winds or wind shear that organize the thunderstorm and create rotation. Its volume is caused by the amount of electrical energy flowing from the cloud itself to the ground.

National Geographic reports that climate change will increase the intensity of thunderstorms. The article notes that the increase in these severe weather events does not necessarily mean that more tornadoes will occur because “only about 20% of supercell thunderstorms produce tornadoes. education.nationalgeographic.org/…

Just ten years ago, Scientific America, in a 2012 article, Has climate change really made thunderstorms more powerful? social media platforms and news reports claimed awareness of extreme weather conditions; however, there was no support for the claim that the weather was becoming increasingly harsh.

But we all know better now. In an article Covering major weather events from 2012 to 2021, the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) examines the number of billion dollar disasters we’ve experienced just here in the United States.

One of the most visible consequences of global warming is the increase in the intensity and frequency of extreme weather events. The National Climate Assessment notice that the number of heat waves, heavy showers and major hurricanes has increased in the United States, and the strength of these events has also increased.

Science Daily reports on research findings More short-lived extreme thunderstorms are likely in the future due to global warming.

New research has shown that warming temperatures in parts of the UK are the main driver of increased intensities of short-lived extreme rainfall events, which tend to occur in summer and cause dangerous flash floods.


Here in North Bay, Tuesday was scorching, hitting 105 in San Rafael with weather reports warning of dry lightning igniting fires on Wednesday. Despite the extremely dry conditions, some people in my house are launching fireworks before the 4th.

What is the weather like in your part of the country?

Kitchen Table Kibitzing is a community series for those who want to share a virtual kitchen table with other Daily Kos readers who don’t throw pies at each other. Come and talk about music, your time, your garden or what you cooked for supper…. Newcomers may notice that many of those who post in this series already know each other to some degree, but we welcome guests to our kitchen table and hope to make new friends as well.



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